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Category Archives: NFL


MIT’s Aero/Astro Department are designing a new type of helmet
and head protection to reduce traumatic brain injury and concussions.
MIT is currently working on this technology by developing helmets lined
with fluid channels.

This newer technology is being created first for the military, then football
players and then other athletic competitors.

Eventually you’ll see it in racing helmets, bike helmets, ski helmets and other recreational helmets where the hope is users will be better protected against concussions and more serious injuries.

Video of MIT’s helmet development

Video

Video


There was a report recently published outlining the top 40/top 50
most valuable sports brands, by a high-profile business magazine.
Well, Real Analytics is about to burst that (incorrectly published) bubble…

We’re sorry that we have to disappoint all the Yankee fanatics and
the stick & ball sport fans, but alas there is more to the sporting world
than the United States. Much more.

According to the high-profile business publication that put the report
out they utilized their OWN proprietary formula to arrive at their
conclusions- (albeit, flawed conclusions)

The reporter who covered the story is a regular on a TV show with the
program initials SM, on the promineant cable network MSG and who has
his own web column as well. The publication is usually reliable, but in this
case we think they have not considered a variety of factors and methods.

The most likely scenario is that the publication employed an in-house
intangible or ‘name’ only valuation or third-party appraisal, as well their
use of a model of correlation between Value and Revenue. Unfortunately,
we don’t know the credibility of those methods and sources.

So, in order to ‘correct’ the somewhat questionable methods,
Real Analytics has put together the Top 5 Most Valuable Sports
Brands/Teams in the sports world, based on the reaserch mostly
derived from a high profile Auditing/Accounting firm.

Before we get to the list, a little tid-bit; The most valuable sporting events– (multiple series events) hands down is Formula One. Oh, we know your
boo-hoo’ing that fact…but it’s a stone cold lead pipe lock folks.
(our homage to the entertaining  and awesome Mike & Mike)

Without further adieu here is the list. (note: exact values are nearly
impossible to attain so approx values within +-1% are utilized)

Top Five Most Valuable Sports Brands/Teams

1. Manchester United: £1.5 Billion (British Pounds)
2. Real Madrid: £1.4 Billion (British Pounds)
3. Scuderia Ferrari: $1.81 Billion (U.S. Dollars)
4. Dallas Cowboys: $1.79 Billion (U.S. Dollars)
5. New York Yankees: $1.7 Billion (U.S. Dollars)


Footnotes:

The published dollar figures consider both the intangible (theoretical)
and tangible (asset based) values of each entity. Furthermore, each value is based upon an “Arm’s Length Transaction” (A-L-T)

Obviously, it would be extremely difficult to parse out pieces of these teams. One could argue for the ‘value’ of just the teams “name” which would
be an entirely intangible valuation.

But then the Yankees would be worth significantly lower than the estimated $1.7 B. That figure includes the Yes network, the stadium, and all other subsidiaries. Same goes for all the top 5 teams/brands.

To separate out the property from the name brand would be very difficult
and not paint a true picture of the entire worth of these organizations.
Therefore a mixed valuation is the correct method. A fractional valuation
would not be practical. One has to take into account both enterprise and
equity values.

Conversely, the figures do not consider any Debt-To-Loan Ratios (D-T-L)
or outstanding debts. Strictly A-L-T Sale Values based on the entire
‘property’ -both intellectual and asset based properties.

The methods and metrics that go into a sports business valuation are very
complicated and very detailed. Some methods employed are DCF
(Discounted Cash Flow- future earnings) Capitalized Earnings, Value Added Analysis, Valuation Multiples, Weighted Averages, Broadcast Rights, Merchandising, etc.

Partial data and figures were sourced from:
Deloitte Touche LTD and FormulaMoney

One last side note, valuations are usually reliable from quarter to quarter.
So during a business cycle year, the top 3 can flip flop. But it is safe to say that the top 3 are all within a few hundred thousand dollars at any given time.


Expanding on our previous post on concussions, Schutt has come out with a Safer Helmet. With more energy absorbing material and a better design. Just what we were stating last year. Football helmets need to be more like top of the line racing helmets.

http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdown_corner/post/This-is-DeSean-Jackson-s-new-anti-concussion-hel?urn=nfl-282521


Head injuries and concussions are the hot topic right now in the NFL and around the sporting world. Rightfully so as well. The incidences and the injuries are significantly increasing. There is no one best solution to this real problem, but limiting the hitting and tackling to a specific ‘zone’ within the body are NOT an answer in our opinion.

The game of football is violent by its very nature, it is part of the sport. It is what separates these incredible athletes from the weekend warriors and armchair qb’s. Permanant head injuries and paralysis are some of the most very unfortunate parts of the game.

Redefining the game is truly not the best solution to curbing head injuries, but rather redefining the protective gear is. With mounting pressure from the media, some fans, sponsors, some players and health care professionals, Commissioner Roger Goodell is bound to make changes. Let’s hope they are not in haste.

Head trauma and head injuries are some of the most under diagnosed and mis-understood afflictions in sports. As more and more data and information comes to light regarding athletes and concussions, the closer sports and medical professionals come to finding a workable solution and possibly better prevention methods.

Last month, former football player Chris Nowinski testified before the House Judiciary Committee, whose chairman, Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.), called for a hearing aimed at placing focus on the issue. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said in his testimony, “We know that concussions are a serious matter and that they require special attention and treatment.” According to the NFL, about 175 concussions occur league wide each season.

More recently the NFL has suspended its in-house study of the long-term effects of concussions in retired players. In the face of heated criticism from outside medical experts, the players union and members of Congress (although Congress involvement is the last thing any sporting entity needs) because of suspect data and conflict of interest.

Gee, you think? The fact is, that the NFL has known for quite some time that concussive injuries are more dangerous with severe long-term aftereffects. So why is it only now, after numerous high-profile concussion injuries in 2009, to both NFL and NCAA stars has the NFL truly addressed this very serious issue. Like almost anything in life…it comes down to dollars.

“Protect the shield” as infamously echoed by the commissioner. Protect it indeed, at almost any cost, until it becomes so glaring and such a problem that action is needed to address the problem. The days of sweeping serious issues under the carpet are gone. In this world of media now, virtually no one or nothing can hide from the stream of real-time information.

Players are now supposedly encouraged to come forth and report and/or disclose any signs or symptoms that may be associated with a concussion. That may be true, but actually getting some of the tougher, hard-nosed players to admit a weakness may prove to be a stumbling block in itself.

Medically, the treatment of concussions are passive and depend mainly on allowing the brain to heal itself utilizing rest and a strict avoidance of activities that may induce a re-injury. It is completely unsafe and irresponsible to return to play while symptomatic in any way following a concussion. Return to play should follow a stringent medically advised step by step process. The prescribed progression will typically vary depending on the duration of post-concussion symptoms.

The Data

National Football League player concussions occur at an impact velocity of 9.3 +/- 1.9 m/s (20.8 +/- 4.2 mph) oblique on the facemask, side, and back of the helmet. There is a dire need for new testing procedures to evaluate helmet performance for violent impacts causing concussion.

Pendulum impacts were used to simulate 7.4 and 9.3 m/s impacts causing concussion in NFL players. An instrumented Hybrid III head was helmeted and supported on the neck, which was fixed to a sliding table for frontal and lateral impacts. Second, a linear pneumatic impactor was used to evaluate helmets at 9.3 m/s and an elite impact condition at 11.2 m/s.

The severity of the head responses was measured by a severity index, translational and rotational acceleration, and other biomechanical responses. High-speed videos of the helmet kinematics were also recorded. The tests were evaluated for their similarity to conditions causing NFL concussions.

It has been noted that football players from age 30 and up to 50 were 19 times more likely to be diagnosed with a memory disorder or dementia than the national average. Players over 50 were diagnosed with dementia-related illness at a rate of 5 times the national average.

A new linear impactor was developed for use by the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE). The concluding results from the pendulum test closely simulated the conditions causing concussion in NFL players. Newer helmet designs and padding reduced the risk of concussion in 7.4 and 9.3 m/s impacts oblique on the facemask and lateral on the helmet shell.

The linear impactor provided a broader speed range for helmet testing and more interactions with safety equipment. NOCSAE has prepared a draft supplemental standard for the 7.4 and 9.3 m/s impacts using a newly designed pneumatic impactor. No helmet designs currently address the elite impact condition at 11.2 m/s, as padding bottoms out and head responses dramatically increase. The new proposed NOCSAE standard to improve football helmet shell and padding design is the first to address helmet performance in reducing concussion risks in football.

The fact is, that football has to invest in better designed and more protective helmets. Cost should NOT be an issue. With teams and the league itself worth billions of dollars, the cost of protective equipment should NEVER be a question or consideration.

Similar carbon fiber/kevlar and energy apsorbing technology and knowledge that is utilized for F1, MotoGP and other motorsport helmets with some version of a Hans type device needs to be incorporated into football helmet design and manufacturing in order to minimize the high rate of brain injuries suffered by football players worldwide.

data sourced from the NFL, Ovid, PubMed and NCAA.


Real Analytics compares the NFL’s top five Passer rating to overall standings.  Three of the top five quarterbacks/teams match up in the overall top five of each catagory. The overall passer rating as defined by the NFL, can be at times somewhat suspect and also misleading.

Although in this case at week 9/10  the two separate statistics are fairly accurate yielding a 67% ratio of the top five QB’s versus top five teams.

Teams at 6-2 were judged by + net points rather than percentage.

NFL Passer Rating (overall)

1. Drew Brees* – NO                   106.1
2. Brett Favre* – MIN               106
3. P. Manning* – IND                105.2
4. B. Roethlisberger – PIT      104.1
5. Aaron Rodgers – GNB         103.3

Standings

Overall W L T
New Orleans * 8 – 0 – 0
Indianapolis * 8 – 0 – 0
Minnesota * 7 – 1 – 0
New England 6 – 2 – 0
Dallas 6 – 2 – 0

(5-4 teams were excluded as both the Giants and Texans lost their last games)

For a more in-depth, analytical view:

http://classic17.wordpress.com/2009/10/19/nfl-passer-ratings/

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